Archive for Team Blog – Page 2

World JOTA-JOTI Team annual meeting

The World JOTA-JOTI Team convened in Kuala Lumpur end of January 2017 for their annual meeting.

The team is led by Richard Middelkoop, PA3BAR, from the Netherlands. Team members include: Hannu “Banda” Rättö, OH7GIG, from Finland; Ali Al-Mamari, A41RV, from Oman; Philip Bird from the United Kingdom; and Jim Wilson, K5ND, from the USA. Also attending this year’s meeting were Stephen Peck, Director of World Events, and (in part) Mihajlo Atanackovic, Digital Engagement manager, both from the WSB Global Support Centre in Kuala Lumpur.

2016 Evaluation

While the detailed world report for 2016 had been drafted during December and January as the reports from NJCs (National JOTA-JOTI Coordinators) were received and incorporated, the team met for a final review before it was formally published. You can find the report at Annual Reports.

We were pleased to see that our promotion efforts paid off and the activity levels increased considerably over 2015, bringing the total youth participation to well over 1 million. JOTA-JOTI remains the largest Scouting event in the world. The world report has more details for you.

The WJJT also noted a couple of improvement points. Notably some details on the new sign-up system, clarification points in communications and further support to NSO’s. Whilst the logo competition, JamPuz and our social media channels are definitely items to keep alive.

Strategic Outlook

By far the most time spent at the meeting was focused at developing a strategic roadmap for the event. The team felt that the annual organization is becoming mature, so it is time to look ahead further into the future. Our starting point is the vision that the World Scout Committee has laid out into 4 segments: we looked at “Innovating Scouting”, “Reaching Out To All”, Strengthening Scouting’s Profile” and “Governance & NSO support”. In each section, the team identified the items that the JOTA-JOTI event currently contributes in one way or another. Next, we identified those points that we felt were the important ones and that we would like to build on.

The team reviewed the first ideas with our World Scout Committee liaison Peter Blatch, using an on-line connection. Peter added a number of suggestions that we could incorporate on the spot.

After ample discussion and further reflection, the WJJT will focus for the next triennium on:

  • NSO support: “promote and encourage“, resulting in doubling the participation numbers
  • changing the profile of the event: forward looking, exploring new possibilities, safe communication.
  • adding innovative educational methods and resources
  • NSO’s to share their best practices

The World JOTA-JOTI Team will elaborate on these points, together with a number of NSO’s and Youth Advisors in a few on-line sessions, to make a high-level roadmap for the JOTA-JOTI event. Annual activities will then result from this roadmap.

2017 Planning

The team adopted the 2017 theme, which will be published soon, together with the launch of the logo competition.

The communication plans were updated for 2017. The team blog posts (like this one) will continue to appear monthly on our web site. An increased use of social media channels is foreseen as well.

The world-wide game will be upgraded; in 2016 some 46 groups managed to solve the John Bont puzzle. We will put out more similar challenges in 2017.

Finally, the work division amongst the team members was slightly adapted to better balance the workload and allow for further personal development.

Teleconference Calls

A highlight of the planing meeting were several teleconference calls with our trusted partner  organizations that are involved with JOTA-JOTI. This included calls with Juha Mäenalusta, Chairman of Scoutlink and Bart Jenniskens, the driving force behind JOTI.tv. These individuals brought fresh insight to JOTA-JOTI from their perspective in providing support to the event.

 

Get prepared for JOTA-JOTI this year from 21 to 22 October. Stay tuned for more updates on our plans for 2017. Next up: the logo competition.

 

We Want To Hear All About Your JOTA-JOTI Weekend

WJR2015Last year we reported that over 1 million Scouts were active during JOTA-JOTI weekend across 151 countries and nearly 18,000 stations. We’ve posted the highlights and the full report.

So, where did we get those numbers?

The annual numbers are compiled from reports submitted by National JOTA-JOTI Coordinators. Your coordinator will be assembling the full report for all locations in your country.

How can I make sure my location report is included?

Contact your National JOTA-JOTI Coordinator with your location’s information. You can find the full list for each country at National JOTA-JOTI Coordinator. They may also have a reporting system where you can submit your information online or via email.

What information is needed?

The information they’ll be collecting includes:

  • Number of participants (Scouts and Guides)
  • Number of visitors (non-Scouts)
  • Number of amateur radio operators
  • Number of contacts
  • List of countries contacted
  • Communication channels used

How about photos, videos, and Scout stories?

SV 10245377_856661904366012_7814956110575330068_n copyYou bet! Your National JOTA-JOTI Coordinator would be delighted to receive some of the best photos and videos from your event.

You can also provide short stories and Scout impressions of your JOTA-JOTI weekend as well. You can find a suggestions with examples at Station Report Best Practices.

Provide your report and watch for the 2016 World JOTA-JOTI Report

Collect your numbers this coming weekend, snap some great photos and videos, and then provide them to your National JOTA-JOTI Coordinator.

Watch for the World JOTA-JOTI 2016 Report. We’ll have it completed and published early next year. It’s all part of celebrating the fun of 2016 while getting ready for 2017.

Thanks for all you do for Scouting and for JOTA-JOTI.

Now tell us all about it!

Minecraft

Our friends at ScoutLink provide some information on how to use Minecraft …

Minecraft during JOTA-JOTI

JOTA-JOTI 2016 is just around the corner, and while there are many ways you can connect during JOTA-JOTI, Minecraft is probably the newest and most intriguing addition to the list.

What is Minecraft?

Minecraft is a game all about mining and placing blocks. There are different types of blocks that you can craft into anything you can imagine. There are ores hidden in the ground that contain diamonds, gold, and more. There are different types of mobs from pigs and sheep which provide useful resources, to skeletons and creepers which you can fight. All of this takes place inside endless, unique worlds with a variety of terrains called biomes, such as jungle and savanna.

scoutlink ScoutLink Minecraft

At ScoutLink, we have a whole team dedicated to developing and maintaining our own Minecraft servers, and making sure it is a fun and safe place to play and connect with Scouts and Guides from around the world. There are different ‘worlds’ available with each providing a different style of play.

The first world is Creative where the users are in creative mode and have unlimited resources. The world is split up into ‘plots’ that users can claim. Once claimed, they can build anything they can think of using their imagination.

The second world is Survival where the users are in survival mode. Resources are limited and the user has to protect themselves and stay alive. Monsters will attack, the weather will change, and health will drop as the user gets hungry. Survival is a very exciting world to play in!

The third world is City which is an attempt to plan and build a city with an aim of being as realistic as possible. Users earn their place on our building team by proving that they can build to a realistic standard. This is a very rewarding world to be a part of, and interesting for spectators to watch progress on the city!

Other worlds will include a variety of games such as SkyWars. We are always open to suggestions for new games.

Minecraft during JOTA-JOTI

The ScoutLink Minecraft Team are busy preparing for JOTA-JOTI and are making sure there is plenty to do throughout the weekend. You can expect to see minigames spotted all over the server, dedicated game worlds, including SkyWars, and chances to win ScoutLink badges. There will always be members of the Minecraft Team online throughout JOTA-JOTI to help you out if you don’t know what to do next!

Logging in is simple: just choose minecraft.scoutlink.net as your Minecraft server, or visit www.scoutlink.net/minecraft for more information.

jota-joti-trusted-partner-logo-2016

Minecraft facilities are provided for JOTA-JOTI by ScoutLink.
ScoutLink is a JOTA-JOTI Trusted Partner.

 

 

scoutlink-minecraft-1

Your own Space discovery

Have you ever wondered how far, or how close we are to the nearest planet?  This JOTA-JOTI 2016 offers you the possibility to discover it. Measure the distance to the Moon. Difficult? No, just use your own JOTA radio station or find another Scout group via the Internet and compare Moon photo’s.

Does this really work?

Yes, it does. And you can do this in the JOTA-JOTI weekend with your Scouts. It takes a little preparation, but not that much as you have all you need already available at your JOTA-JOTI weekend. So now is a good time to start your preparation for this exiting part of the weekend.

Afbeeldingsresultaat voor moon

So what do I do now?

Ask your JOTA radio amateur to prepare some equipment to send a radio signal to the Moon. In their jargon, it is called EME or Moonbounce. That’s all for now.

If you want to do the internet version, locate a Scout group on the other side of the globe. E.g. by using the list of Scout groups already signed up for the event. Agree on a time during the JOTA-JOTI weekend that you both take a photo of the night sky, with the Moon in it. That’s all for now.

What’s next?

Download our Advanced Discovery Project nr 1.  It shows you the detailed recipe how to measure the distance to the Moon during the JOTA-JOTI weekend.  Your preparations will come in hand. Run the activity with your Scouts either using the radio or the photos over internet. Or both if you like.

The ADP project can be downloaded here.

Then what?

Check your results with the published distance to the Moon that you can find on the internet. Have you come close? Don’t forget to send the measured result to your National JOTA-JOTI coordinator, so your group experiment can be mentioned in the World JOTA-JOTI report after the event.

Have fun ….. discovering our world.

 

 

Why You Should Sign Up Your JOTA-JOTI Location

JOTA-JOTI Sign Up TodayJamboree on the Air and Jamboree on the Internet will soon be here. The third weekend in October, this year 14-16 October, will see an explosion of communication across the amateur radio airwaves and the Internet with over a million Scouts and Guides participating across 150+ countries.

Sign Up Benefits Everyone

So, who will be on for the weekend? The only way to know ahead of time is to sign up your location. Once you’ve signed up, the other locations around the world will know to look for you. Likewise, you’ll be able to see at a glance all the rest of the locations from across town to the other side of the Earth.

Our theme is “Discover Our World” and this is a great way to determine who’s on and to map out your own effort to discover our world. Plus, when you sign up you’ll receive your JID code so you can participate in JamPuz.

How Do I Sign Up?

First, make sure you’ve created a Scout.org profile and that you’ve logged into Scout.org. This sets you up to access all the webpages you’ll need.

Second, start at the JOTA-JOTI Sign Up page. Only one person needs to sign up for your location, which will be good for everyone who attends. Follow the links on the sign up page to enter the system.

What Information Will I Need?

You’ll sign up by selecting your country, choosing WOSM or WAGGGS, selecting your National Scout Organization, and then filling in:

  • Name of Group or Event – This would be your Scout group or your special event name.
  • Location – Town or City.
  • Amateur Radio Call Sign – If you’re going to participate on amateur radio.
  • IRC Nick Name – This is your nickname that you’ve registered on ScoutLink or another Internet chat service.
  • Other Identifiers – This can include your Skype, Facebook, Twitter, etc.
  • When You Plan to Take Part – Select all that apply from Friday to Sunday.
  • Contact Person Name and Email – This is the contact person for your location.

That’s all the information you need. Click the “submit” button and you’ll be registered. You’ll also receive an email confirming your sign up. That email will contain a link you can follow to make any needed changes to your information.

You’ll find the list of all stations at Registered Stations. Search for your own and for others you know or would like to contact during JOTA-JOTI weekend.

Sign Up is Just the Starting Point

Once you’ve signed up and viewed the online list of all locations, you’ll be all set for JOTA-JOTI weekend. That’s where the fun starts.

But don’t stop there. You can also report on your activities after the event. Your National JOTA-JOTI Coordinator will be in touch to collect your reports. You can find the full list for each country at National JOTA-JOTI Coordinator.

Your coordinator will be assembling the full report for all JOTA-JOTI locations in your country. Needed information includes:

  • Number of participants (Scouts and Guides)
  • Number of amateur radio operators
  • Number of visitors
  • Number of contacts and countries contacted
  • Communication channels used

They may also ask for some of your best photos and stories of your JOTA-JOTI weekend.

Sign Up is Simple – Do It Now

It is simple and straightforward. So go to the JOTA-JOTI Sign Up page now and make it happen.

Looking forward to seeing your location listed and to contacting you during the weekend.

World JOTA-JOTI Team